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Tomato, Tomatl, wiki rewrite #3 (love-apple)

Updated: Jan 6



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tomato


The tomato is the edible berry fruit of the Solanum Lycopersicum plant, better known as the tomato. It originates from western South America and Central America. The Aztecan word “tomatl” turned into the Spanish word “tomate,” and now the English name “tomato.”


The Aztecs may have originated the tomato’s domestication. The Spanish observed the Aztecs eating the tomato during the Spanish 16th-century conquest of the Aztec Empire. The Spanish brought the plant back to Europe, where its popularity spread.

The tomato has a diverse place in the human diet, eaten raw or cooked in many dishes, sauces, salads, and drinks. Though a fruit, people use the tomato as a vegetable ingredient or side dish. Tomatoes are a significant source of umami flavor.


Indeterminate tomato plants are perennials in their native habitat but cultivated as annuals. (Determinate plants are annuals that stop growing at a certain height and produce a crop all at once.) There are many tomato plant varieties grown in temperate climates across the world. Greenhouses allow year-round tomato production. Tomato plants grow 1–3 meters (3–10 ft) high, and the tomato berry ranges from 1-10cm (1/2-4in) in width. They have vines with a weak sprawling stem that requires support.


Updated Nov 25, 2020:


*not included in the original wiki page but I like this:


love-apple (n.) old name for "tomato," 1570s, corresponding to French pomme d'amour, German Liebesapfel, but the reason for the term remains obscure. One guess is that it is a corruption of Italian pomo de'Mori or Spanish pome dei Moro, literally "Moorish apple." (1)


1) "love-apple." Online Etymology Dictionary: https://www.etymonline.com/word/love-apple?utm_source=extension_searchhint

Original:


The tomato is the edible, often red berry of the plant Solanum lycopersicum,[1][2] commonly known as a tomato plant. The species originated in western South America and Central America.[2][3] The Nahuatl (the language used by the Aztecs) word tomatl gave rise to the Spanish word tomate, from which the English word tomato derived.[3][4] Its domestication and use as a cultivated food may have originated with the indigenous peoples of Mexico.[2][5] The Aztecs used tomatoes in their cooking at the time of the Spanish conquest of the Aztec Empire, and after the Spanish encountered the tomato for the first time after their contact with the Aztecs, they brought the plant to Europe. From there, the tomato was introduced to other parts of the European-colonized world during the 16th century.[2]


Tomatoes are a significant source of umami flavor.[6]


The tomato is consumed in diverse ways, raw or cooked, in many dishes, sauces, salads, and drinks. While tomatoes are fruits—botanically classified as berries—they are commonly used as a vegetable ingredient or side dish.[3]


Numerous varieties of the tomato plant are widely grown in temperate climates across the world, with greenhouses allowing for the production of tomatoes throughout all seasons of the year. Tomato plants typically grow to 1–3 meters (3–10 ft) in height. They are vines that have a weak stem that sprawls and typically needs support.[2] Indeterminate tomato plants are perennials in their native habitat, but are cultivated as annuals. (Determinate, or bush, plants are annuals that stop growing at a certain height and produce a crop all at once.) The size of the tomato varies according to the cultivar, with a range of 1–10 cm (1⁄2–4 in) in width.[2]

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