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Two years, two months, two days: My Walden (plus wiki rewrite #7)




Henry David Thoreau lived alone at Walden Pond for two years, two months, and two days. A long time to live alone, and maybe an anaphoric rhetorical device? He wrote, "I left the woods for as good a reason as I went there. Perhaps it seemed to me that I had several more lives to live, and could not spare any more time for that one."


What causes us to know when we're experiencing something that's run its course?


I had a Walden Pond. I spent two years, two months, and two days living on its shores. I recalibrated my humanity there. I cried and laughed at its beauty, and at its inevitable, natural life cycle, which sometimes felt very cruel, and sometimes it felt like it just was and would always be. At times I thought I'd never leave. But one day, which happened to be the second day of the second month of the second year, I did. Fortified, wary, but ready to experiment with a new life. However, I understand Piranesi's longing to return.


New edit:


Walden (/ˈwɔːldən/): a book written by American transcendentalist Henry David Thoreau in 1854 as Walden; or, Life in the Woods. Thoreau wrote of his experience of "two years, two months, and two days" living in solitude at Walden Pond. The work is considered a personal declaration of independence, a social experiment, a voyage of spiritual discovery, a satire, and a self-reliance manual.


Thoreau hand-built a cabin at Walden Pond, property owned by his friend, mentor, and fellow transcendentalist Ralph Waldo Emerson, near Concord, Massachusetts.

Thoreau recorded precise scientific observations as well as metaphorical and poetic uses of natural phenomena. He identified plants and animals by their popular and scientific names, recorded the color and clarity of different bodies of water, dated and described the freezing and thawing of the pond, and recounted his experiments measuring the depth and shape of Walden Pond's supposedly "bottomless" bottom.

Original text:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walden


Walden (/ˈwɔːldən/; first published in 1854 as Walden; or, Life in the Woods) is a book by American transcendentalist writer Henry David Thoreau. The text is a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings. The work is part personal declaration of independence, social experiment, voyage of spiritual discovery, satire, and—to some degree—a manual for self-reliance.

Walden details Thoreau's experiences over the course of two years, two months, and two days in a cabin he built near Walden Pond amidst woodland owned by his friend and mentor Ralph Waldo Emerson, near Concord, Massachusetts.

Thoreau makes precise scientific observations of nature as well as metaphorical and poetic uses of natural phenomena. He identifies many plants and animals by both their popular and scientific names, records in detail the color and clarity of different bodies of water, precisely dates and describes the freezing and thawing of the pond, and recounts his experiments to measure the depth and shape of the bottom of the supposedly "bottomless" Walden Pond.

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